Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th European Biopharma Congress Vienna, Austria.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Wilfried Dimpfel

University of Giessen, Germany

Keynote: Reverse pharmacology of sceletium tortuosum
Euro Biopharma 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Wilfried Dimpfel photo
Biography:

Wilfried Dimpfel is Honorary Professor at Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Germany, since 1983. He is Pharmacologist and got his Neurophysiological Education during 1973-1974 as Max Kade stipend (New York) at the NIH Bethesda from Phil Nelson. Together with Hans-Carlos Hofmann, a Physicist and Mathematician, he developed quantitative EEG software for research and practice. He is Consultant and CSO at NeuroCode AG, Wetzlar, Germany. He published more than 150 papers in peer-reviewed
journals.
 

Abstract:

A “reverse pharmacology” approach was started with an extract of Sceletium tortuosum, currently sold as Zembrin® in
the USA, Canada, Brazil, Malaysia, and South Africa. It is a proprietary extract of a low-alkaloid cultivated selection of
Sceletium tortuosum, and is used by healthy people for enhancing mood, decreasing anxiety and stress and improving cognitive
function under stressful situations. As test model the hippocampus slice in vitro was chosen to compare its effects with four of its
alkaloid constituents, namely Mesembrine, Mesembrenone, Mesembrenol and Mesembranol. Measurement of the amplitude
of population spikes was performed in the presence of single shock stimulation and theta burst stimulation resulting in long
term potentiation (LTP). Rats were treated daily for one week with 5 or 10 mg/kg of Zembrin® before the hippocampus was
taken out for in vitro analysis. Amplitudes of the population spikes were dose dependently attenuated. Out of four glutamate
receptor agonists only Fluorowillardine was completely unable to induce its agonistic action. This points to an AMPA receptor
mediated attenuation of hippocampal excitability produced by repetitive dosing of Zembrin®. Superfusing the slices directly
with the alkaloids at nanomolar concentrations (3.5 – 35 nM) resulted in a concentration dependent attenuation of population
spike amplitudes. However, only Mesembrenol and Mesembranol were able to prevent the action of Fluorowillardine, thus
resembling the effect of the whole extract. Comparing now the chemical formula of the alkaloids in terms of a structure activity
relationship, the hydroxy group at C6 instead of a carbonyl group in mesembranol seems to be essential for interaction with
AMPA dependent transmission. Since attenuation of AMPA mediated transmission has been related to successful adjunctive
treatment of epileptic patients, Mesembranol - following the principle and methodology of “reverse pharmacology” - might
serve as chemical lead for the development of new drugs for the treatment of epilepsy.

Keynote Forum

Jamal Ouazzani

National Center for Scientific Research CNRS, Institute for Chemistry of Natural Products ICSN, France

Keynote: Ethnopharmacology and neurodegenerative diseases: Past achievements and future expectations
Euro Biopharma 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jamal Ouazzani photo
Biography:

Abstract:

Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) cover various pathologies and associated disorders. The most known and disabling are
Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease, causing motor disorders and dementia. NDs affect the
ageing population and represent one of the most challenging public health issues worldwide. The situation is particularly critical
due to the increasing number of patients, the cost of treatment, and the societal impact of day-to-day care and dependence. As
an example, around 7 million European citizens suffer from Alzheimer's disease with a total care cost reaching 155 billion euros
each year. Besides existing drugs addressing the symptoms rather than the cause, alternative natural solutions based on natural
extracts or pure compounds are driving growing interest. This presentation begins with an overview of the current state of the
art in the use of natural resources and the products they contain, to combat the potential causes and consequences of NDs.
We will then move on to the results we have obtained in the field, by using innovative extraction technologies and controlled
biotransformation processes to enhance the effectiveness and the safety of the end products.
 

Keynote Forum

Amots Dafni

Haifa University, Israel

Keynote: Rise and fall of mandragora autumnalis as a medicinal plant
Euro Biopharma 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Amots Dafni photo
Biography:

Abstract:

The earlier evidences for the medicinal uses of Mandragora autumnalis are from Sumer and the Bible. The main uses of the
mandrake (sometimes with a combination of other narcotic plants), along the generations, are: aphrodisiac, antispasmodic,
sedative, anesthetic, analgesic, emetic and antidote for snakebites. For each use I'll survey: the history and the intensity
throughout the history till the present day, the pharmacological background in relation to modern chemical analyses and pros
and cons. It is concluded that most of the uses of M. autumnalis, as a medicinal plant, were almost completely abandoned.
The reasons for this tendency are: 1. The poisonous and narcotic properties, as well as other uncontrolled side effects of the
mandrake. 2. The development of the modern safe and efficient drugs which successfully replaced the traditional uses of the
plant. The use of the mandrake as aphrodisiac still exists, maybe due to the deep belief rooted in mythology, religion and
history which are hard to be eradicated.
 

Euro Biopharma 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Vladimir P Torchilin photo
Biography:

Vladimir P Torchilin, PhD, DSc is a University Distinguished Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Director, Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Nanomedicine, Northeastern University, Boston. His interests include drug delivery and targeting, nanomedicine, multifunctional and stimuli-sensitive pharmaceutical nanocarriers, biomedical polymers, experimental cancer therapy. He has published more than 400 original papers, more than 150 reviews and book chapters, wrote and edited 12books, and holds more than 40 patents. Google Scholar shows more than 44,000 citations of his papers with H-index of 96. He is Editor-in-Chief of Current Drug Discovery Technologies, Drug Delivery, and OpenNano, Co-Editor of Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and on the Editorial Boards of many other journals. He received more than $30 M from the governmental and industrial sources in research funding. He has multiple honors and awards and in 2011, Times Higher Education ranked him number 2 among top world scientists in Pharmacology for the period of 2000-2010.
 

 

Abstract:

Tumor therapy, especially in the case of multidrug resistant cancers, could be significantly enhanced by using siRNA downregulating
the production of proteins, which are involved in cancer cell resistance, such as Pgp or survivin. Even better
response could be achieved is such siRNA could be delivered to tumors together with chemotherapeutic agent. This task is
complicated by low stability of siRNA in biological surrounding. Thus, the delivery system should simultaneously protect
siRNA from degradation. We have developed several types of lipid-core polymeric micelles based on PEG-phospholipid or
PEI-phospholipid conjugates, which are biologically inert, demonstrate prolonged circulation in the blood and can firmly
bind non-modified or reversibly-modified siRNA. Additionally, these nanopreparations can be loaded into their lipidic core
with poorly water soluble chemotherapeutic agents, such as paclitaxel or camptothecin. In experiments with cancer cell
monolayers, cancer cell 3D spheroids, and in animals with implanted tumors, it was shown that such co-loaded preparations
can significantly down-regulate target proteins in cancer cells, enhance drug activity, and reverse multidrug resistance. In order
to specifically unload such nanopreparations inside tumors, we made them sensitive to local tumor-specific stimuli, such as
lowered pH, hypoxia, or overexpressed certain enzymes, such as matrix metalloproteases. Using pH-, hypoxia-, or MMP2-
sensitive bonds between different components of nanopreparations co-loaded with siRNA and drugs, we were able to make
the systems specifically delivering biologically active agents in tumors, which resulted in significantly improved therapeutic
response.

Euro Biopharma 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hiroshi Ohrui photo
Biography:

Hiroshi Ohrui received his PhD degree (1971) from The University of Tokyo. He joined RIKEN during 1966 and moved to Tokyo University in 1981 and moved to Yokohama University of Pharmacy in 2006. He worked for Dr. J J Fox at Sloan- Kettering Institute for Cancer Research during 1972-1973 and Dr. J G Moffatt at Syntex Research during 1973-1974. He received several awards including Inoue Prize for Science (2001), Japan Prize for Agricultural Sciences (2004), The Japan Society for Analytical Chemistry Award (2004), and Japan Academy Prize (2010). His research interests cover organic synthesis, chemical biology and chiral discrimination.
 

Abstract:

4’-C-Ethynl-2’-fluoro-2-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) has attracted much attention due to its extremely excellent anti-HIV
properties (1. prevent the emergence of resistant HIV mutants 2. over 400 times more active than AZT and several orders
of magnitude more active than the other clinical reverse-transcriptase inhibitor 2’, 3’-dideoxynucleoside drugs 3. very low toxic
4. long acting 5. could be used for prophylaxis, and so on). EFdA is now under clinical investigation as MK-8591 by Merck
& Co. In my talk, the development of EFdA, especially the design of it will be presented and discussed. For the design of the
modified nucleoside which could solve the problems (1. emergence of drug-resistant HIV-mutants. 2. adverse effects by drugs.
3. necessary to take plenty number of drugs) that the clinical drugs have, I have proposed the following working hypotheses to
solve the problems. They are: (1) the way to prevent the emergence of resistant HIV mutants, (2) the way to decrease the toxicity
of modified nucleosides, (3) the way to provide the nucleoside with the stability to both enzymatic and acidic hydrolysis of
nucleobase. 4’-C-substituted-2’-deoxynucleoside was designed to meet the hypotheses (1), (3) and the 2-site-modification was
conducted to meet the hypothesis (2). The details of the hypotheses and the reason of the 4’-C-substitution will be discussed.
To prevent the deamination of adenine base, fluorine atom was introduced at the 2-position of adenine base. Finally, EFdA
which is modified at the two positions of the physiologic 2’-deoxyadenosine and has extremely excellent anti-HIV properties
been successfully developed.

  • Drug Delivery System of Biopharmaceutical Products | Clinical Trials on Biopharmaceutical Products | Drug Therapy | Biologics and Biosimilars | Biopharmaceutics: Drug Discovery and Development | Cellular and Gene Therapy | Biopharmaceutical Companies & Market Analysis
Speaker

Chair

Vladimir P. Torchilin

Northeastern University, USA

Biography:

K Kvell, MD PhD has primary expertise in Immunology and Biotechnology. He works in the field of Immune Senescence and its relation to steroid compounds.
Currently he is working at the Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, at the University of Pecs, Hungary. He is currently involved in
interdisciplinary research utilizing steroid compounds and nanoparticles. This field encouraged the collaborative research team to develop novel drug delivery
strategies of steroid treatment, to allow for targeted steroid treatment with potent anti-inflammatory effect, yet with reduced level side effects.  [email protected]

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Steroids are acknowledged anti-inflammatory drugs used in multiple conditions, including autoimmune
disease. Steroids provide strong suppression of inflammation however, their long-term utilization triggers numerous adverse
effects including obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis, edema retention etc. As a result, only inflammatory flares are treated with steroid
compounds, for short term.
Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Our collaborative research team has produced nanoparticles of specific size harboring
steroid compounds. In theory, due to their specific size, steroid-harboring nanoparticles trigger phagocytosis in monocytes and
macrophages, but leave other (non-phagocytic) cells unaltered.
Findings: Our human in vitro data indicate that steroid particles show potent anti-inflammatory effect on monocytes / macrophages,
equivalent to that of steroid solution. However, their adverse effects are reduced using non-phagocytic cells. Liver cells, for example,
show increased viability with steroid particles as opposed to steroid solution.
Conclusion & Significance: Our working hypothesis was that steroid-particles of a specific size range can preferentially target
monocytes/macrophages, the major mediators of inflammation. Other (non-phagocytic) cell types shall largely be unaltered by
steroid particles, as opposed to steroid solution. This is confirmed by our data. Our technology allows for the production of regular
steroid compounds with significantly reduced side effects, with the promise of long-term use in human.

Biography:

Divya Chadha Manek is the Head of Business Development (Commercial) for the NIHR Clinical Research Network (CRN). Her role is to maintain strategic
relationships with global and UK life sciences companies and the Clinical Research Network. She also leads on ensuring that the Clinical Research Network
is abreast of new study delivery innovations to ensure that the organization is evolving to service life sciences industry requirements. With a degree in Clinical
Psychology and a Master’s in Clinical Research, she has worked with the Clinical Research Network for the past nine years. Her first role with the CRN was
delivering commercial contract clinical research within a National Health Service (NHS) hospital. Prior to her current role, she worked as the Industry Manager
within the Mental Health team, performance managing and maintaining oversight of the national mental health portfolio of studies. She has experience of clinical
research from a site level and from a national perspective in the UK. She is currently studying PhD in Dementia Care.
Theo Christie is a Business Development Manager (Commercial) for the NIHR Clinical Research Network (CRN). Theo facilitates key discussions between industry
and the Clinical Research Network and is a point of contact for the life sciences companies engaging with the Clinical Research Network. Theo is able to provide
advice to companies on how they are able to tap into the Clinical Research Network study support services to ensure clinical studies are set up efficiently and
recruit to time and target. With a degree in Clinical Sciences, Theo has been with the Clinical Research Network for over four years. He previously worked within
the Research Delivery Directorate of the CRN, collaborating with the life sciences industry and national specialty groups across 10 therapeutic areas, providing
operational support through feasibility, set up and patient recruitment.

Abstract:

Is the NHS ready for the biosimilars boom? to most, biosimilars are a no-brainer. But as with anything new, there are early adopters
and sceptics. The NIHR CRN is an independent, government-funded organization which supports delivery of the majority of
clinical research in England - and with that comes unique insight. The NIHR CRN can report that attitudes, appetites and acceptance
in relation to biosimilars in the UK are changing. Despite being approximately ten years ahead of the US our approach and acceptance
of biosimilar drugs, in 2015 it came to light, some commercial trial sponsors were overlooking the UK as a destination for biosimilar
trials - claiming that the appetite for delivering these types of trials was low. The NIHR Clinical Research Network was drafted to
sharpen the UK’s competitive edge. In this presentation we will reveal why life science companies were overlooking the UK to deliver
their trials, and how these challenges are being overcome using the Clinical Research Network structure which is unique to the NHS
in England. Companies can now continue to place their biosimilar trial in UK with confidence and get ahead of the game when it
comes to study set-up, feasibility, and patient recruitment. This presentation will present a range of perspectives (via video clips)
which illustrate how the UK’s appetite, capacity and capabilities to deliver biosimilar clinical trials have developed in parallel with the
expansion of the biosimilars market. You will hear from those involved in conducting biosimilar trials - the clinicians, investigators
and nurses at the coal face of research delivery in the NHS. We’ve also captured the NHS Trust R&D viewpoint, along with some
thoughts from the NHS pharmacy team. The British Biosimilar Association offers up some interesting ideas, but probably the most
memorable perspective is that of the patient.

Biography:

Claudia Menzel is a PhD student from the Institute of Pharmacy at University of Innsbruck. Her work focuses on the improvement of drug bioavailability and the
development of drug delivery systems for the non-invasive administration of poorly absorbed drugs. She has published three papers and one review article in
reputed journals.

Abstract:

The goal of this study was to establish a new type of preactivated thiomers showing comparatively higher reactivity with mucus
and improved mucoadhesive properties. The dimeric form of 2-mercaptonicotinic acid (MNA-MNA) was directly attached
to the polymeric backbone of chitosan (CHI) to achieve a higher reactivity. Amide bond formation mediated by 1-ethyl-3-(3-
dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) was used as a coupling reagent. The remaining free amino groups were reacted with
succinic anhydride (Succ) to gain a homogeneously anionically charged polymer (CHI-Succ-MNA-MNA). Within our study, various
coupling rates of up to 170 μmol MNA-MNA per gram polymer were obtained. The coupling of the dimeric ligand resulted in
a preactivated thiomer with a more reactive disulfide substructure due to the additional nitrogen atom in conjugation over the
aromatic moieties. Furthermore, the obtained polymer is completely preactivated and therefore protected against unwanted oxidation
reactions. Our kinetic studies of disulfide exchange reactions showed a 3.8-fold higher reactivity of CHI-Succ-MNA-MNA compared
to a state-of-the-art preactivated thiomer. Rheological measurements showed that CHI-Succ-MNA-MNA with a coupling rate of 170
μmol (CHI-Succ-MNA-MNA 170) lead to a 5.7-fold higher mucus viscosity than the non-thiolated control polymer (CHI-Succ).
This indicates a rheological synergism due to mucoadhesive properties. These results were confirmed by an additional mucoadhesion
experiment, which showed a significantly prolonged retention time of CHI-Succ-MNA-MNA on the small intestinal mucosa
compared to CHI-Succ (P<0.02). According to the presented results, the double preactivation seems to be a promising strategy to
obtain entirely preactivated polymers with improved mucoadhesive properties.

Biography:

Abstract:

Aim of the Study and Ethnopharmacological Relevance: District Kotli is a mountainous area ranging from scrub to alpine forests
which is sporadically known with reference to ethnopharmacological research. Such studies are mandatory for discovering new crud
drugs based on the folk knowledge. This study was aimed to collect knowledge of medicinal plants and folk herbal remedies from the
local inhabitants.
Materials and Methods: In all, 100 local informants including 55 were males and 45 were interviewed using semi-structured
questionnaire in addition to group discussions and field observations. Different ethnobotanical indices such as Spearmann test,
relative frequency of citation (RFC), Relative Importance (RI), Informants Consensus Factor (FIC) and Medicinal Importance (MI)
were calculated from the recorded data. Besides, to check the novelty of information, the recorded data was compared with the
literature from the recent past.
Results: In all, 80 medicinal plants were used in treating 58 diseases/ailments by the indigenous communities. Comparing the
knowledge held by men and women, men had much higher knowledge on medicinal plants (Z = -2.8; p < 0.05) and their uses (Z
= -0.252; p< 0.005): they reported 14.05 (±10.18) species and 6.12 (±4.13) uses, while women 8.55 (±6.06) species and 5.83 (±3.65)
uses. Abdominal pain was the most prevalent problem treated with nine species (7.38%), followed by acute injuries & pain (7 spp.,
5.74%) and diabetes (5 spp., 4.10%). The Informants' Consensus Factor (FIC) analysis indicated that among the 19 disease categories
used, mouth, ear and eye problems (0.91), skin and related symptoms (0.91), circulatory problems (0.90), allergies (0.90), hair related
problems (0.90) and diabetes (0.90) had the highest FIC values. Aerial parts (21spp.) and leaves (20 spp.) were highly utilized for
making recipes. The oral application of powder was the leading mode of application (21 spp., 26.25%). Zanthoxylum alatum possessed
the highest relative importance (93.75), followed by Adhatoda zeylanica (91.67).
Conclusions: The high informant consensus suggests that current use and knowledge of medicinal plants are still strong and local
inhabitants have a high dependency on medicinal plants in meeting their primary health care. This knowledge can be exploited in
validation of this knowledge for the drug development and pharmacological activities in addition to the conservation and management
of these valuable plant resources of this territory.
Keywords: Ethnopharmacological research, Local inhabitants, Frequency of Citation, Relative Importance, Informants Consensus
Factor, Medicinal Importance.

  • Ethnopharmacology of Medicinal Plants | Ethnoveterinary Medicines |Phytochemical Studies of Plants and Plant Extracts | Pharmacology and Toxicology | Clinical pharmacology | Natural Products Chemistry and Pharmacology | Immunopharmacology | Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics

Chair

Ning-Sun Yang

Biography:

Abstract:

Larval stage of flatworm, tetrathyridium, has ability of survival and asexual multiplication in a wide range of vertebrate hosts what
indicates a high biochemical and physiological potential for adaptation. We recently developed axenic long-term in vitro cultivation
systems of larvae under both hypoxic and aerobic conditions, representing the unique eukaryotic model for pharmacological and
molecular studies. This in vitro system allowed us to study the dose- and time-dependent effects of various natural compounds on
multiple biochemical and molecular pathways in larvae. We have focussed on flavonolignans (silybin, dehydrosilybin and silychristin)
prepared from silymarin, the main component of herb Silybum marrianum and two other flavonoids: bergenin and arbutin. Activity
of individual compounds on metabolic activity of larvae, which reflects activity of enzymes of complex I and II in mitochondria, was
dependent on oxygen tension in culture. Flavonolignans also modulated activity of other enzymes like GST, SOD, enzymes involved
in glucose transport, in lipogenesis, cell death and motility, indicating their complex activity on multiple targets in larvae.

Biography:

Abstract:

The three ayurvedic medicinal plants Withania somnifera, Emblica officinalis, and Bacopa monnieri, were extracted by high-pressure
static extraction using the Zippertex technology. The extracts were mixed to reach quantifiable amounts of active compounds
identified by HPLC-MS analysis. The mixture of extracts was incubated with resting cells of the fungus Beauveria bassiana ATCC
7159. The fermentation promoted the fluidization of the starting dense mixture, while HPLC monitoring evidenced the disappearance
of glucogallin from E. officinalis extract and the concomitant increase in Gallic acid content. While topical exposure of the chick
embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) to the non-fermented extract led to an extensive necrosis, the fermented extract was
not toxic and reduced the CAM vascularization, supporting its antiangiogenic potency. The innocuity of the fermented extract was
demonstrated using the in vivo LD50 test, the morphological examination of internal organs of treated rats, as well as the evaluation
of blood biomarkers of liver damage (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase). The fermented extract SNC-1 was
developed as a nutraceutical antiangiogenic treatment of age-related macular degeneration and commercialized in an oral form
named Ethnodyne-Visio. Furthermore, study showed that SNC-1 (dried from of Ethnodyne-Visio) was able to significantly protect
neurons (cortical as well as dopaminergic neurons – in vitro models of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases) from different injuries
(β amyloid, mitochondrial toxins, glutamate). Additionally, SNC-1 stimulated neurite outgrowth). Interestingly these effects were still
observed at low doses and were still efficient when the extract was applied up to 4h after the toxins application. Extensive efforts are
dedicated to the identification of the active compound responsible of these effects. Clinical trials are underway to confirm the benefit
of SNC-1 for Alzheimer and Parkinson patients.

Biography:

Abstract:

The use of herbal medicines as complements or alternatives to modern medicines has been on the increase. This review summarizes
research carried out on some Cameroonian medicinal plants between 2007 and 2017 by our research team at the Faculty of
Science of the University of Douala in collaboration with some national and international scientists. Medicinal plants are resources of
traditional medicines and modern medicine derived from plants. This study was designed to outline some biologic activities of various
medicinal plants extracts used by the Cameroonians’ and central African people. Several medicinal plants growing in Cameroon were
identified as having pharmacological properties. These plants species which include Crassocephalum bauchiense, Dichaentanthera
africana, Harungana madagascariensis, Milletia conraui, Nauclea latifolia, Pecedanum zenkeri, Ptelopsis hylodendron, Schefflera
barteri, Strychnos icaja, Strychnos malacoclados with healing properties are listed alongside their traditional use and a summary of
the scientific research achieved are given. They were tested for their in vitro or in vivo biological activity by standard protocols. These
ten plants have shown antimicrobial, antioxidant, antiplasmodial, immunomodulatory, analgesic, antipyretic, anti-Herpes simplex
virus and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities. Natural products (diterpenoids, alkaloids and flavone) have been identified from five of
them. The results suggest that the plants extracts could be a promising rough material for the development of new and more effective
modern drugs. Based on these results, drugs from Crassocephalum were developed but no patent is obtained till today.

Hoang Le Tuan Anh

Mientrung Institute for Scientific Research, Vietnam

Title: Searching for drugs from Vietnamese ethno-medicine plants
Biography:

Abstract:

Vietnam is easternmost country in Southeast Asia where the climate changes considerably from place to place due to differences
in latitude. There are two World Natural Heritage Sites (Halong Bay and Phong Nha - Ke Bang National Park), and six biosphere
reverses (Can Gio Mangrove Forest, Cat Tien, Cat Ba, Kien Giang, the Red River Delta and Western Nghe An) in Vietnam. We
are one of 25 countries which possess a uniquely high level of Biodiversity. Vietnam is hometown to an estimated 12,000 species
of high-value plants; approximately 3,780 (~ 36%) medicinal plants; and account for approximately 11% of the 35,000 species of
medicinal plants known worldwide. There are 54 ethnic groups in Vietnam with their own characters (language, lifestyle and cultural
heritage). That’s why many ethno-medicine plants are not yet known and are used only by ethnic groups. Until now, hundreds of
Vietnamese medicinal plants were studied such as Physalis angulata, Cleistanthus indochinensis, Ophiopogon japonicus, Garnoderma
lucidum, Camellia bugiamapensis, Momordica charantia, Hedychium coronarium, Annona glabra, Callisia fragrans, Eurycoma
longifolia, Cudrania tricuspidata, Tacca species, Mallotus species, Glochidion species, Solanum species, Trichosanthes species, etc. A
lot of potential compounds were discovered from Vietnamese medicinal plants such as physalin B, D, F, G; malloapelta B, peaonol,
cleistantoxin, desgalactotigonin, berberin, rotundin, rutin, artemisinin, artesunat, etc. The opportunities to discover new drugs from
Vietnamese ethno-medicine plants with the collaborators worldwide are so big.

Biography:

Abstract:

Oxidative stress and amyloid beta toxicity are involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's diseases. We have previously demonstrated
that an extract prepared of the plant Achillea fragrantissima (Af) protected cultured brain astrocytes from oxidative stressinduced
cell death and down regulated microglial activation. Using activity guided fractionation, we have purified from Af an active
flavonoid named 3,5,4-trihydroxy-6,7,3-trimethoxyflavone (TTF). TTF protected cultured astrocytes from H2O2–induced cell death
via interference with cell signaling (inhibition of SAPK/JNK, ERK 1/2, and MEK1 phosphorylation) and by reducing the levels of
oxidative stress-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). The mechanism of the protective effect of TTF against H2O2-
cytotoxicity could not be attributed to a direct H2O2 scavenging but rather to the scavenging of free radicals as was shown in cell free
systems. In addition, TTF protected cultured neuronal cells from amyloid beta cytotoxicity via interference with cell signaling events
and by reducing the amyloid beta - induced levels of intracellular ROS. Moreover, TTF exhibited anti-inflammatory activities and
inhibited the LPS-elicited secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines Interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-1beta from microglial cells. Our
results suggest that TTF might be a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease as well as other neurodegenerative
diseases where oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and amyloid beta toxicity are part of the pathophysiology.

Biography:

Abstract:

From the night of time, Man has always tried to relieve his suffering by turning his attention to Nature and seeking remedies
to cure the ills of his body. In recent decades, phytotherapy has been re-evaluated, not only because of the growing number of
patients who use it, but, above, all, since numerous preclinical and clinical researches have been able to demonstrate and confirm
the pharmacological bases of plant-based treatment, since acquired in the past from traditional medicine in empirical way. Today
phytotherapy has become a medical discipline in all aspects, because it applies the method and the rigor of scientific evidence. Here
it is addressed the history, current as well as the future perspective of AD treatment by Ethnomedicine, taking into consideration
the probable causes and preventive mechanisms together with the treatment methods. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible,
slowly progressive neuodegenerative disease of the brain, and it is characterized by memory deficits and progressive cognitive
impairment, accompanied by neuropsychiatric changes. It has become the fourth leading cause of death in developed countries.
The main symptoms of AD are primarily caused by a cholinergic dysfunction due to degeneration of basal cholinergic forebrain
(BCF). in particular, consistent neuronal loss into the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM), which produces a reduced cholinergic input
to target areas such as cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Pathogenic cause of AD remains incompletely understood. So, currently
acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs), which decrease the breakdown of the neurotransmitter, has been the main symptomatic
therapy for mild to moderate Alzheimer’s patients, approved by FDA. To date, AChEIs are considered the main pharmacological
strategy in the palliative approach in the therapy of AD; they undoubtedly, temporarily restore the disrupted cholinergic transmission
in brain. Consequently, the search for novel compounds is necessary. In recent times, several chemical and pharmacological studies
have searched for new drugs, in an attempt to extract and isolate from plants novel compound or better understand the effects of those
already known, in an effort to fight this terrible disease.
Conclusions: AD is a multi-causal and multi-factorial progressive neurodegenerative disease with complicated pathogenesis. Thus it
is likely that multiple drugs or drugs with poly-pharmacological activities will be the best therapeutic approaches to address the diverse
pathological aspects of the disease.Anti-cholinesterasic activities, anti-Aβ aggregation and anti-Aβ-induced oxidative injury such as
anti-NMDA-induced toxicity and anti-inflammatory activity showed by many herbal compounds, encourage their use as potential
disease-modifying drugs for neurodegenerative disorders, opening to new insight and future perspectives for a multi-functional
phytomedicine. From this point of view, we have to overcome our way to think Ethnomedicine and official medicine opposed each
other, or that orthodox medicine is better than traditional medicine, as well as phytotherapeutic remedies as an alternative to synthetic
drugs. The two pharmacological approaches are often, and it should always be, complementary; that is, to be able to complement each
other. Science and consciousness of physician will depend on the correct integration of. In conclusion, Evidence based pharmacology
(EBP) is the conscientious, explicit, judicious and reasonable use of modern, best pharmacotherapeutic evidence in making decisions
about the care of individual patients. EBP must integrate clinical experience and patient values with the best available research
information.
Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Neurodegeneration, Multi-target drus, Disease-modifying therapy, Phytotherapy, Preventive
Mechanism, Treatment Methods.

Biography:

Abstract:

Background: The use of essential oils (EOs) is known since long time in traditional medicine and aromatherapy for the management
of various oxidative stress-related disorders and is further increased recently for their neuroprotective and anti-aging potential as well
as for reducing anxiety and stress.
Purpose: To evaluate, for the first time, the chemical composition of Citrus lumia Risso EO and its antioxidant, anti-cholinesterase
as well as neuroactive properties by cell-free and cell-based assays. Citrus lumia Risso is one of the oldest cultivated limettes in Sicily,
Mediterranean Europe and North Africa by which distinguished for the fruit shape and mainly for the sweet, no-acidic juice.
Methods: The distribution and morphology of oil glands in the fruit peel were analysed microscopically, by SEM. A phytochemical
profile elucidation, by GC-FID and GC-MS analysis, an in vitro evaluation of antioxidant and free-radical scavenging properties
of the EO, using different in vitro methods (Folin-ciocalteu, DPPH, TEAC, FRAP, Fe2+-chelating capacity, ORAC and β-carotene
bleaching assays) as well as anti-cholinesterase activity were carried out. The impact on the spontaneous electrical activity of rat
neuronal networks by means of microelectrode array (MEA)-based system, was evaluated.
Results: The EO has shown strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties, particularly in hydrogen atom transfer based
assays (β-carotene bleaching and ORAC assay, IC50 22 μg/mL and 46 μg/mL, respectively), that can be attributed to the high content
of monoterpene and monoterpene derivatives, especially d-limonene (48.905%), and linalool (18.245%). Furthermore, has shown
an interesting anti-acetylcholinesterase activity (IC50 258.25 μg/mL). Data from MTT analysis indicate that the cytotoxicity of OE,
evaluated on L929 mouse fibroblasts, is very low, with an IC50 higher than 500 ug/mL at 48 h. Rat neuronal networks subjected to EO
showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of spontaneous electrical activity.
Conclusions: Results indicate that this EO could be an important source of natural antioxidants potentially useful in the detoxification
mechanisms of the organism, suggesting an important preventive role in the onset of oxidative stress-related pathologies.

Biography:

Ning-Sung Yang is a Distinguished Professor and Distinguished Research Fellow of Academia Sinica and the associated universities in Taipei, Taiwan. He has
helped the development of gene gun technology and pioneered its application to mammalian transgene experimental systems and gene therapy approaches. After
thirty years of a research career in USA, Dr. Yang established the Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center in Academia Sinica, Taipei. He was elected in 2006
as a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS, USA). He has published more than 160 research papers, and obtained 14 USA
patents.

Abstract:

In our recent studies, we showed that many phytochemicals or their derivatives can confer diverse pharmacological activities in
preventing tumor metastasis (See References). These phytochemical activities regulate the immune system or non-malignant
cells in a tissue microenvironment under various in vivo conditions. And these activities cannot be effectively addressed by the
conventionally used cell culture systems in vitro. Our current strategy is to initiate our study through a combination of omics
approaches and specified in vivo tumor model systems. Specifically, we first make predictions for candidate specific pharmacological
activities according to the “omics screening” profile of differential responsive genes, proteins or involved metabolites. Then we make a
list of hypothesis in priority sequence. Finally, we detect/evaluate the candidate mechanistic signaling cells/molecules for suppression
of well-defined tumor metastasis activity. With this strategy, we have been successful in evaluating several pharmacological effects
of nature plant phytochemicals or their derivatives on immune cell systems or the surrounding nonmalignant cells in defined tumor
microenvironment. The omics approaches we used to predict and reveal the specific pharmacological activity of phytochemicals
or medicinal herbal extracts/fractions, including genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and the next generation
sequencing (NGS) systems. The systematic analysis of the observed data is to “contemplate” the cellular or physiological responses,
according to the various pattern changes detected in different response elements. Technically, in our task on pathway and net-working
analyses, the overall or big trend/pattern of the different responsive elements or/and their signaling systems is the key for predicting
specific pharmacological mechanisms, instead of the “super” inducer or suppressor single gene activities. For instance, the “expression
pattern or trend”, rather than the “fold change”, of specific microRNA species is a much more important factor for predicting their
suppressive effect on target genes. As a result, the understanding and background knowledge of specific targets or signaling networking
pathways of specific disease targets are quite important and need to be carefully reviewed “first” before “searching the omics data” in a
totally randomized way. With this approach, whether the expression trend of their downstream genes can fit the proposed hypothesis
is also considered as a key factor.

Biography:

Abstract:

Honeybee is an important economic insect, which have vital role in the pollination for crops and wild flowers. In addition to
ecological importance, honeybee supplies with various products, including bee venom (BV). This venom has been used in
traditional medicine for thousands of years and there is an increasing interest in their applications in modern medicine. BV has
diverse biological activities as anticancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antiviral and hepatoprotective. Today there is an urgent
call to find anticancer agents from the natural products with less ecological damage and minimum health and environmental hazards.
Our main aim is to identify and characterize the bioactive peptides from bee venom. These peptides have been poorly characterized,
partly because they are generally present in trace quantities. Isolated active peptides from the bee venom have been identified using
techniques including High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), Mass Spectrometry (MS, LC/MS, MS /MS), Amino Acid
Analysis (AAA) and 2D-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (2D-NMR). Polar fractionation prior to screening of anticancer
has been done. The bioassay-guided isolation for bee venom leads to isolation of four peptides melittin, apamin, MCD and secapin.
Melittin showed cytotoxic activity on three cancer cell lines: lymphoma cells U-937GTB, myeloma cells RPMI 8226/s, leukaemia
cells CCRF-CEM and two drug-resistant sub-lines (PRMI 8226/Dox40 and CEM/VM-1), with IC50 values of 1.3, 1.1, 1.4, 1.7, 2 μM,
respectively.